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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    54

    Arrow Homemade PS3 Coolingpad Guide

    After a first YLOD, I bought a slim and made a nice COOL coolingpad for it. I couldn't find a nice one at the online store and decided to make one. The result is great, the PS3 runs much cooler.

    Sorry for the typo, I'm from Holland. Here is a small tut...

    At the bottom of your ps3 (slim) you see the air intake between these lines

    Homemade PS3 Coolingpad Guide-0-jpg

    The parts what I have used are:

    2 aliminium plates 40cm x 30cm

    Homemade PS3 Coolingpad Guide-1-jpg

    These Xilence 120mmfans are very quit

    Homemade PS3 Coolingpad Guide-2-jpg

    On/off switch

    Homemade PS3 Coolingpad Guide-3-jpg

    Power adapter

    Homemade PS3 Coolingpad Guide-4-jpg

    Power Tape

    Homemade PS3 Coolingpad Guide-5-jpg

    Led light strips to pimp the cooler

    Homemade PS3 Coolingpad Guide-6-jpg

    Something for the bottem of your pad to lift it

    Homemade PS3 Coolingpad Guide-7-jpg

    Some wires and a transparant placemat

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    54

    Part 2

    After all the parts, I started to use my imagination

    1. Place the ledstrips on the plate with sided adhesive tape

    Homemade PS3 Coolingpad Guide-8-jpg

    2. The green tape on each corner is to prevent the fans from vibrating when toching the aliminium plates

    Homemade PS3 Coolingpad Guide-13-jpg

    3. Fasten your fans on one of the aliminium plates with the buttons or screws, in the line of the airintake from your PS3

    Homemade PS3 Coolingpad Guide-10-jpg

    4. Connect all the red wires (+) and the black wires (-)

    Homemade PS3 Coolingpad Guide-11-jpg

    5. Connect your fancables +/- for safety with a cable connector like this. The other side is +/- for your power adapter.

    Homemade PS3 Coolingpad Guide-12-jpg

    6. Put the power button through one of the holes of the plate and fasten with the button cap. You may need to make the hole bigger. Connect the wires of the on/off switch between one wire of your power adapter to let the switch work

    Homemade PS3 Coolingpad Guide-15-jpg

    7. Fasten your second aliminium plate to the fans with the butons/screws

    Homemade PS3 Coolingpad Guide-16-jpg

    8. For the edges between the plates you can simple cut a tranparent placemat in size and close it, fasten with the power tape.

    Homemade PS3 Coolingpad Guide-17-jpg

    This is the result.

    Homemade PS3 Coolingpad Guide-19-jpg
    Homemade PS3 Coolingpad Guide-18-jpg
    Homemade PS3 Coolingpad Guide-21-jpg

    Greetzz from Holland

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    24,927
    Very cool (no pun intended ) and +Rep for sharing the guide as well Tiger007!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    27
    hey thats not too bad. this is also universal which is cool. perhaps a v2 would include the power supply into the framework and have a single wire going to the plug point. in v3 you could even add a relay triggered by the usb port on most consoles these days and use the relay to power the device when the console is enabled. keep up the good work.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    54
    Quote Originally Posted by PS3 News View Post
    Very cool (no pun intended ) and +Rep for sharing the guide as well Tiger007!
    Thank you

    Quote Originally Posted by Anger007 View Post
    hey thats not too bad. this is also universal which is cool. perhaps a v2 would include the power supply into the framework and have a single wire going to the plug point. in v3 you could even add a relay triggered by the usb port on most consoles these days and use the relay to power the device when the console is enabled. keep up the good work.
    Hey there thank you for your ideas. Maybe I add a fan controller too

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    27
    i wonder - what about having a thermal sensor coming out the back to detect the consoles heat (will work with all current consoles) and you could use one of those fan speed controllers for pc (the ones that fit in a drive bay and read cpu temps) which is ready made and comes with a temp sensor so all you would need to do is rig up something for the thermal sensor and integrate it into your design. thats a costly approach however but its another idea i had.

    just ignore me now, my ideas are getting a bit silly for a cooler me thinks - i have too much free time as you can see lol.

    anyway i'm liking your work keep up the good work.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    1,186
    Very cool. I have seen people use laptop coolers on the PS3, but yours looks better than most of those.

    How much was your total cost for this project?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    54
    Quote Originally Posted by Anger007 View Post
    just ignore me now, my ideas are getting a bit silly for a cooler me thinks - i have too much free time as you can see lol.
    I really like your ideas lol

    Quote Originally Posted by windrider42 View Post
    How much was your total cost for this project?
    The total cost was about 35 euro's. The power adapter not included, this one was from my old multi-carger.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    6

    Cool

    Awesome! Thanks for the detailed guide

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    54

    Exclamation Safety

    Important! I saw that step 5 in part 2 is missing..

    Connect your fancables +/- for safety with a cable connector like this. The other side is +/- for your power adapter

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